Sunday, 24 June 2012

Life 4 - Hello Dear, What Did You Do Today?

The quilt is now sold. Images of the quilt will shortly be available on tea towels, aprons, cards etc. Please contact Annabel on annabelrainbow@yahoo.com direct if you would like to purchase.  (We -Laura Kemshall and myself - are just in the process of printing, and everything will be on the website shortly)

 Life 4 - "Hello Dear, What Did You Do Today" has been selected by
Roxane Zand, Sotheby’s, Amy Mechowski, currently Sotheby’s Institute, previously Curator at V&A, Andrew Gwilliams, White Cube, and Len Massey, RCA, to be part of the Spirit of Womanhood Exhibition at the Oxo Tower, South Bank, London in March



If you'd like to see it if you're in London, and give a rousing cheer for art quilts in general, the Exhibition will open to the public 20th - 30th March 11.00-18.00 at galleries@OXO, South Bank, London.

The Exhibition Private View is 18.30 on Tuesday 25th March, Opened by Melvin Bragg. 


WIN is running an associated Festival Day ‘Voices of Womanhood’ in conjunction with Women’s Voices Now film archival 10.00-22.00 at the Roxy Bar and Screen.
 
www.annabelrainbow.co.uk


Life 4 - Hello Dear, What Did You Do Today?

53" x 38" (without binding)

Quilt over chair - English piecing over papers, applique, stitch, paint.

The words on the body of the lady say:


"Well dear, I worried. I had coffee this morning. Coffee is the second most valuable legal commodity after oil but is largely grown by subsistence farmers and I forgot to buy Fair Trade.

Then I took our grandchildren to school. Did you know that 90% of all childcare still rests on women’s backs.

On the way to the hated supermarket to buy food, I saw that lady from the house by the park in her burkha who everyone says is lonely and abused but can’t tell the police in case her family is deported, and thought about the veiling and seclusion of women and the cult of virginity and the death penalty for women’s adultery, and tried to imagine what it was like to be killed with stones.  I thought of rape and how under Shar’ia law a rape victim needs four male witnesses to substantiate her testimony. In the west we might just say she’s making the whole thing up. I thought how rape could end if men just stopped doing it.


Then I had my hair done and looked in the mirror and saw how old I was. When you get old you cease to exist, people just don’t seem to see you any more. Perhaps I should lose weight or wear high heels to make me taller and show off my legs. Perhaps my nose needs altering or I could get my ears pierced or my teeth whitened. This made me think of trying to look nice and how odd this was when 140 million women have been circumcised and cruelly mutilated because it reduces libido and prevents promiscuity.   No, I’ll just bleach and perm my hair and put on false eyelashes and shave my legs and pad my bra, and file and paint my toenails. I’d best skip lunch or I’ll get fat.

I pottered about the garden and planted some lettuce. I thought of the women who make up over 50% of the world’s population yet only hold the title to 1% of the land, and produce more than half it’s food.  They work 2/3rd of the worlds working hours but receive 10% of the world’s income.

Then I paid a visit to that frail neighbour who The Meals On Wheels lady told me about. She’s seems sad and alone because her family have had to move to search for work and she’s frightened and doesn’t want to go into residential care but she’s in the system and she thinks no one is listening.


Then I collected the grandchildren from school and took them to cubs and ballet and thought of childbearing and the way fertility can be controlled, and the 35% of all Puerto Rican women that were sterilized by the US Agency for Development.


Then I came home to do the cleaning and the cooking, sort out the clothes and do the washing, and remembered what the Ladybird books taught me in school. 

“Here we are at home says Daddy.
Peter helps Daddy with the car, and Jane helps Mummy get the tea. 
Good girl, says Mummy to Jane. You are a good girl to help me like this.”

When I had our children I worked part time for 20 years without sick pay or a pension and tried to nurture everyone in sickness and life, and help keep them fed and educated.  If an Englishman’s home is his castle why doesn’t he clean it. Only 3% of PLC directors in Britain are women and only 4% of judges. 78% of all clerical workers are women, but only 11% are managers.

Then I started to work on my quilt, and you’re reading it now. Women artists only earn 1/3 of male artists. So I stopped and made your tea.  That’s how I spent my day, dear, how about you?"

50 comments:

  1. I have really enjoyed following the process of your quilt.....what you have written on the body is just awesome.....I just wanted to keep reading.......Cathy

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  2. I am speechless ... congratulations, as Cathy(above) says I just wanted to keep on reading.

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  3. Thank you very much. Better out than in as they say!!

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  4. Such a thoughtful, and thought provoking, piece!

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  5. Very Powerful, BRAVO! I absolutely love it!

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  6. Fantastic! By the third paragraph I was almost yelling out loud YES YES YES! What a wonderful piece of work. Humor, compassion, empathy, sarcasm and wonderful art. What more could an artist want of her work? Thank you so much for using your voice so aptly!

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  7. Wonderful!! Words and art!

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  8. So infuriating, frustrating and unfair, and I fear that it will not change, only get worse ..... but I loved the quilt.

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  9. So infuriating, frustrating and unfair, and I fear that it will not change, only get worse ..... but I loved the quilt.

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  10. Love it, thanks for sharing. I would love to see a close up of the words. Are they stitched? Printed?
    -Jeanette

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  11. There are close ups on the postings around this one Jeanette. The words are stitched - free machined in white thread - then painted over.

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  12. This is so amazing and incredible, one of the most powerful art pieces I've seen in a while! I'm an instant fan!

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  13. Brilliant. Beautiful. Moving. Blood-boiling. Thought-provoking. Thanks for making this. And despite all this, I'm glad I have the experience of being a woman.

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  14. Inspiring! Such powerful words. Get it sista friend!

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  15. Imcredibly inspiring, and aggravating and enlightening.....what a mental and emotional roller coaster......appropriate no??/

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  16. may i share this entry on my blog. I am not sure if http://fashionethos.blogspot.com or http://fashionrip.blogspot.com is the more suitable. If you have a preference let me know. Women working with issues through their art makes me proud of us all, deborah

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  17. Thank you Deborah, both for asking and for liking Life 4 sufficiently to be interested in passing it on.

    You may indeed link to my posting, although because of copyright issues, I would prefer that the image stayed on my blog and website.

    All the best, Annabel
    www.annabelrainbow.com

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  18. Loved the honesty of the quilt and your writing.

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  19. saw you on DMTV and wanted to read your quilt. I love your work and to hear your message. My friend saw your first piece and really was wild for it. Now I have 3 others to show her. Thanks for speaking your mind.

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  20. Interesting article, and powerful images in the painting. All of this could have more impact if the sources for the statistics reported were cited somewhere. While some may not doubt their veracity at face value, the fact that many of them are rather round numbers has the effect of making them open to speculation. After all, 78% of stats (including this one) are made up on the spot.

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    1. To be fair anonymous, probably 98% don't care about the sources. It's a story stitched onto a quilt, and I'm afraid it's not an article as such. Thankyou for your comment though, I have replied to it on a posting. Please remember that all the quilts are stories, not essays or articles!

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    2. Only a man would need proof by source to be satisfied that these statistics are true. Even if they are rounded up they represent a great inequity that begs for correction. I am amazed that women still struggle for equality and sadly at the hands of both men AND women!

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  21. I wish I was so eloquent with words. You seem to be able to express not only what you are thinking and feeling, but what others are.

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  22. WOW, Your quilt looks and sounds wonderful. So glad I found your blog x

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  23. I was passing through Leamington Spa today and saw the exhibition. I love your quilt; the writing on her body, the books behind her on the shelf. so eloquent. Brilliant!

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  24. Wow! I viewed all of your galleries, beautiful pieces. I would love to know more about you but the "about me" selection is blank. Great work!

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  25. What a powerful message of truth and wisdom! Keep on keeping on, you have amazing ability in quilting and in the written word!
    Thank you

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  26. Annabel this is amazing work ... so stunning ... I hope to see it one day. Love, Carolyn x

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  27. This piece is brave and beautiful and it is an honour to look at it and to be able to congratulate the maker.

    Congratulations.
    xx

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  28. Hi i found your blog by pinterest. i wish your art could be heart from women in every language. so true, like it.
    Greetings from wiebke Germany

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  29. I also found your blog via pinterest. Jaw-dropping quilt for design and substance. Good to know I'm not the only one who crafts like that too lol. Thank you so much for sharing your work!

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  30. Wow, I just got a notice from Pinterest that my pin of this work had been removed. At first I thought it was because you preferred not to have it up there, which I fully understand. But, no, it was taken down because the image involved nudity! I sent Pinterest a blistering e-mail, telling them it was a quilt and not a human body, and if they were going to ban it then they should also be banning a significant number of famous paintings throughout the centuries. Somehow I would be surprised if I hear back and even more surprised it they put it back up there! Heh, keep up the good work, it's getting somebody's attention. :-)

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    1. I sure hope they don't remove my pins ; I also pinned Annabel's quilt to several of my boards.

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  31. Pinterest have a bit in their terms and conditions that state No Nudity. It's obviously difficult to enforce and what I think has probably happened is that someone has complained and they've removed the image. It happens all the time. Some of the comments I've had from people who pin on pinterest have been truly wonderful, but some have been dreadful. I gave up worrying about it long ago as you simply can't please everyone all the time. Thank you for your support and going to all the trouble to write - it's appreciated - but I think, like you, that it will go unheeded. Sorry I couldn't reply directly to you but you didn't leave an email address.

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  32. Pinterest also removed my pin of this quilt too! I say we flood them with questions! I love how they are protecting us from the form of an old woman when where are so many, many other body images that I am certain will remain up. I was a bit nicer in my response to them:

    Hi.

    I got a notice from you (Pinterest) today that you removed one of my art quilt pins.

    Your email said:
    "The pin was called "PAINTED QUILTS: Life 4 - Hello Dear, What Did You Do Today? - Read the text that's quilted into the woman's body." and it was on your board Quilts. "

    Your policy says:
    "Our no nudity policy applies to photographic images. It does not apply to illustrations, paintings, sculptures, etc. We do not allow nude photographic images that contain visible nipples, genitalia, and/or exposed buttocks."

    This was an art quilt of an old woman sitting at her sewing machine. It was not a photographic image. I believe it falls into the "etc" category of what your policy does not apply to.

    I don't see how the quilt could be considered a photographic image. Unless you are counting that it was a picture of a quilt. Which seems a wee bit legalistic.

    Could you please advise?

    Thank you

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  33. Thank you for the beautiful quilt. except for the breasts she has the same shape as I and it is the first time, I have looked upon a heavyset woman like myself an thought how wonderful she looked.

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  34. Annabel,
    thank you for sharing your work.
    You are an artist of the highest order in my view.
    The quilt is sensational in so many ways.
    It has made my day to share this
    Anne

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  35. This work of art is totally amazing. You have so much tallent!
    It is sad that it was removed from pinterest, but fortunately, there are other media where it won't be removed. I hope it will be shown in quilt shows around the world.

    I wonder if the "David" would be removed from Pinterest?

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  36. This work of art is totally awesome. You are an amazing artist, in quilts and words!!! you have such great tallent.
    It is so sad that pinterest removed the quilt but there are so many other social media that it will be seen. I hope it will be entered into many quilt shows around the world.

    I wonder if Pinterest would remove the "David" should a picture of it be posted?

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  37. Thank you so much for your continuing support - it is wonderful! I've replied direct to you where I can but can I just add that the quilt can be seen as part of Through Our Hands (www.throughourhands.co.uk) at Festival of Quilts this summer. It has been sold, but the new owner has given permission to show it.

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  38. Sharon Murphy5 March 2013 13:19

    I just love you quilts, and I can't wait to see the next one.

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  39. Oh Annabel, that could be me sitting there! Wonderful piece of work in all sorts of ways.

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  40. Thank you for this wonderful quilt and text. You sure do capture the complexity of it all.....and still made a cup of tea. I love that you see injustice, and hold it in the context of living a life, apparently without becoming bitter. Sally Pooler

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  41. Just stumbled upon a photo of this quilt on Pinterest. Magnificent execution, and I laughed out loud!

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  42. A truelove inspirational quilt.

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  43. That brought goosebumps to my skin. Thank you!

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  44. Thankyou Anabel for this wonderful quilt and for detailing the quilting message. Although I am happy I was born female, what irks me most is how it renders you often invisible to others. Including other women! Which is a whole other quilt....

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  45. This is si true. We take care of our families, work , take care of all the ails. If our husbands are in the military, we shoulder all of the load. We try to save and earn and we comje hoe to face all the work to be done homeework, and try to ease the cares of our children. We go under paid and of the biggest job of all, wife and mother we see no relief. It is a 24 hour job and it is taken for granted.there aren't any atta boys. When we are at our tiredest we have other needs to be met and they can't understand why we can't respond to the sex and make them feel like the big hemen they seem to want to think they are. They come home from an 8 hour job and they get to rest and weekends are their time off and to rest up before that 8 hour job again and there are the moms and the women that still have that job to do. Their birthdays, anniversarys, holidays forgotten by everyone.they are just the mister nobodys that carries everyone forward. They say if a woman was paid for the work and overtime she puts in, she would be the highest paid person in the world.cudos on the quilt, but no matter what they always fall short and get dumped like the rest of the garbage.

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  46. Annabell, you are my new quilting hero; I admire your moxie! On your next quilt you need to tell everyone how you really feel! [wink] I loved this quilt it's just brilliant! I have posted your link to every one I know! I emailed this link to my husband, and I could hear him practically falling off the chair in his office, when he started reading your quilting lines. If I should ever get to England I would love to meet with you; we both share like political frustrations. Your quilt should be on display at the United Nations; it just might move them to really do something about this Sharia Law nonsense...

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